Toll Free - U.S.& Canada:  1-800-521-8065   Hong Kong:  800-930-623   Australia:  1-800-779-835   Singapore:  800-130-1595  
United Kingdom:  0-800-047-0963   Switzerland:  0-800-563-178   Russia:  810-800-2189-4011   Israel:  1-809-494-225  
Germany:  0-800-180-0341   Italy:  800-785-323   Spain:  900-809-732   China:  400-990-0892  
 
General Chinese
eChineselearning provides a huge number of Chinese resources for Chinese language learners. The materials in this section are designed to teach Chinese to non-native Chinese learners of various skill levels. These basic Chinese language materials are edited by eChineselearning's professional teaching staff. And best of all, they are totally FREE! If you are interested in learning Chinese, the basic Chinese language resources in this section will be of a great use to you!

The Spring Festival is fast approaching and Chinese people are looking forward to enjoying themselves. However, the Spring Festival is not just a festive, carefree time, there are also many superstitions, or taboos, which you should pay attention to. As a significant part of Chinese traditional culture, these taboos show people’s hope of fending off ...


“拜年(bàinián),” to pay a New Year’s call, is a traditional Chinese custom during the Spring Festival. “拜年(bàinián)” is a way for the Chinese to say goodbye to the current year and ring in the new one, and it provides Chinese people with opportunities to show the ir best wishes to relatives and friends. However, many young Chinese people are not willing to pay New Year’s visits. Can you guess why? Let’s have a closer look!


The Spring Festival is coming up soon and Chinese people are preparing to welcome the Year of the Sheep. It is around this time that you may hear some Chinese people claiming that this coming year is his or her year of fate. What do they mean by this? Read on to find out!

 

A ...


One basic meaning of “后(hòu)” is “after or later”, such as “一周后(yìzhōuhòu) after a week” and “三天后(sāntiānhòu) three days later.”

Example

Wǒ sāntiān hòu qù běijīng.
我   三天     后    去 北京。
I will leave for Beijing in three days.

 

At some point you will come across the word “后(hòu)” used in phrases like: “80后(bālínghòu) children of the 80’s” ...


If you take a look at Chinese social sites like WeChat and Weibo you will probably notice a number of people who proclaim themselves to “有钱就是任性(yǒuqián jiùshì rènxìng) or “有钱,任性(yǒuqián, rènxìng).” Once you understand the meaning of the phrase you will probably wonder what this world is coming to. This buzzword was officially listed as ...


Are you the kind of person who is desperately overcommitted and suffering from exhaustion? Are you still upset about your most recent failure? Are you living with terrible pressure? If so, you’re the victim of negative emotions. To resolve these problems, you need some “正能量(zhèngnéngliàng),” which can save you from feeling constantly disappointed or drained ...


New Year’s Day 2015 is coming! Happy New Year! New Year's Day is an official holiday in many countries, but different countries celebrate the day in unique ways So what is New Year in China like? How do Chinese people celebrate it? Let’s take a closer look!

In China New Year’s Day is called “元旦 (yuándàn).” ...


Christmas and the New Year are coming. Have you picked gifts? Trying to find the perfect gift to buy for friends, relatives, children etc, can be a bit overwhelming at times, and that’s without having to tiptoe around cultural taboos. Chinese are very careful when giving gifts. Colors, quantities and local customs are all taken ...


“拼(pīn)” means “to put together” or “piece together.” When you see someone spare no effort to do something, you can remark that he is very “拼(pīn).” When used for this meaning, “拼(pīn)” is used as an adjective or a verb, meaning to strive or struggle for something.

pīnchē/pīntuán/ pīndān
拼车/       拼团/      拼单

The character “拼(pīn)” can be used ...


When you first come to China, you will hear Chinese people say things like “打电话(dǎdiànhuà),” “打车(dǎchē),” “打球(dǎqiú),” etc. As you may know, “打(dǎ)” basically means “hit,” “beat,” “break,” or “attack.” With so many meanings, it’s not surprising if you start to get confused. So the big question is, why do Chinese people “打(dǎ) hit” so ...


In theaters in ancient China, when there was a show, some wooden tablets bearing the names of the actors would be hung at the door of the theater. The tablet placed at the very front was called the “头牌(tóupái),” referring to the lead actor in the performance. The term “大牌(dàpái)” is derived from this and ...


Lately, discussions on social networking sites have turned their attention to, what some argue to be, a new type of ideal boyfriend called “暖男(nuǎnnán).” So, what is it about this type of men that makes them so sought after? Do you or your man have the characteristics of a “暖男(nuǎnnán)”?

“暖(nuǎn)” basically means “warm,” but in ...


If one day, one of your friends tells you that he or she is going to "裸婚(luǒhūn),” don’t be tricked by the phrase’s literal meaning of “naked wedding.” There’s no need to worry if you don’t know what the term actually means, because today we are going to cover all the interesting uses of “裸(luǒ).” ...


At the recently concluded 2014 Inchon Asian Games, Ning Zetao won the gold medal in the Men’s 100m Freestyle Final and set a new Asian Games record. Now he is called “泳坛新秀(yǒngtán xīnxiù)” by the media. Here, “泳坛新秀(yǒngtán xīnxiù)” means a new swimming star.

“秀(xiù)” literarily means beautiful, elegant and pretty. It can also refer to ...


Are you a Facebook user? If so, you must know of Mark Zuckerberg, the founder and CEO of Facebook. However, you may not be aware that he is also a good Chinese speaker. His wife is American-born Chinese, so he has been learning Chinese for four years and can now easily use the language to ...


Literally, “霸(bà)” means “to dominate, lord over, tyrannize over or rule by force.”

xué bà
学    霸

“学霸(xué bà)” is a new buzzword that has recently been spread widely on the Internet, but we also use it in our daily lives. If we call someone a “学霸(xué bà),” we mean that he or she is a hard-working ...


“门(mén)” is a very common Chinese word, but it has more meanings than its basic meaning of “door.” For example, we use phrases like “有门(yǒu mén),” “没门(méi mén),” and “走后门(zǒu hòumén)” which are typically used in their erhua form, as “有门儿(yǒu ménr),” “没门儿(méi ménr),” and “走后门儿(zǒu hòuménr).” Today, we will take a look at the ...


Think back to your school days and the classmates you went to school with, or are currently going to school with. Each of us can probably think of at least one boy and girl who were extremely attractive and well-liked. They may have also been good at their studies or sports, and the rest of ...


If you have been to northern cities in China such as Beijing and Tianjin, you must be familiar with the following oral expressions: “爷们儿(yémenr),” “姐们儿(jiěmenr),” and “哥们儿(gēmenr).” Actually, these expressions have nothing to do with grandpa, sister or brother as the names might suggest. Rather, they are all colloquial words used in daily communication. At ...


 

If you have a passion for online shopping, you must know that feeling of intently and thoroughly browsing a site, glued to the computer screen, until you find that perfect item at the best price. It can certainly be satisfying to finally get what you wanted. Well, it is well known that China has some ...


Sign up for a free trial now!
Get a FREE live 1-on-1 lesson and a FREE e-book. Complete the form below:
Your name:  E-mail: 
Country:  Tel: 

Blog Search
Subscribe This Blog
Share
Sign Up for Our Newsletter
Name:
 
E-mail:
 
 
Sample Newsletter